An Introduction

Posted in Portfolio

Introduction
to The Storys Find Their Way, Part Two in a Series by Gail Story Opp

The Great Depression had deep roots and long branches casting a shadow over Americans throughout the 1930s, ending when World War II began. The tale of three Storys resumes, three women whose resilience passes the test of trying times. Frannie, or Frances Story, is an enterprising widow who wields the typewritten word to battle despondency in small, Long Island backyards composed of a rocky substance known as hardpan. Her column’s success is guaranteed because of her skills and the timeliness of its subject matter. Chuckie, or Charlotte Story, is the peacemaker whose practicality and good humor has held the family together as long as her little sister can remember, putting out small fires and playing a kind and motherly role. Now it is her time to set forth and spread her wings. Gailie, or Abigail Story, is the narrative’s voice, the sprightly one with a big heart. Gail observes with wide and eager eyes everything around her, and is delighted with what she finds, imagining great things in her optimism and having to deal with the parts that don’t fit.

Frannie had been a suffragette two decades earlier and had fought hard to gain women the right to vote. With the same determination, she must now find a new job in an unfavorable economy. Newspapers are laying-off, not hiring. A move to an even smaller home plunges the family into an adventure that is as lively for them as it is fateful for her. An inspiration turns their fortune, but ends with her calling a reprieve that turns into anything but! Chuckie foresees the outcome but must go upstate to college leaving Gailie to ride out trouble alone. Gail can do that with a distraction: she has found love.

From trying to grow a garden in all but unworkable earth, to discovering romance, this is a domestic history occurring close to a fireplace or coal stove where a little dog dozes. Enjoy these three endearing and very human characters as seen through the eyes of a young person who owns she was no longer a child but not yet an adult in an era before the word “teen” had been coined. Tilling the soil of hardpan times, the Storys make light work of the Great Depression.

– Jerri Strozier

Back Blurb

From tilling Long Island topsoil for Frannie’s new freelance assignment, to romance, nothing is quite like it first appears in the next episode of the Story family. This domestic history set in the Great Depression is anything but dark. Conversations as warm as the kitchen fire are recounted by young Gailie who is not yet an adult but neither is she a child. Her loyal heart is bound to a sister, a mother, a dog and a new school friend who has an answer for everything.